New Zealand

Location: New Zealand is a country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean consisting of 2 main islands, both marked by volcanoes and glaciation.
Capital: Wellington
Major Cities/ Counties: Auckland, Wellington, ChristChurch, Hamilton, Dunedin, Palmerston North
Main Language: English and Maori
Climate
New Zealand has a largely temperate climate. While the far north has subtropical weather during summer, and inland alpine areas of the South Island can be as cold as -10 C in winter, most of the country lies close to the coast, which means mild temperatures, moderate rainfall, and abundant sunshine.
Economy
GDP: 185 billion USD (2016)
Currency: New Zealand Dollar(NZ$)
Government: The politics of New Zealand function within a framework of a unitary parliamentary representative democracy. New Zealand is a constitutional monarchy in which a hereditary monarch—since 6 February 1952, Queen Elizabeth II—is the sovereign and head of state.
Area: 268,021 km2 (103,483 sq mi)
Distance from India: 13.2 hours
Population: 4,773,970 (2017 estimate)
Time Zone: NZST (UTC+12)
Why study in the NEW ZEALAND?
  • You get a British-based education (due to their British influences) for a percentage of the cost. Students applying for jobs in the UK with a degree from New Zealand are highly sought after by UK employers.
  • Staying in NZ is an amazing opportunity for anyone who looks for adventure. In New Zealand, there are literally thousands of things to do. Do you like to hike? There are plenty of mountains for you to explore. Do you enjoy being a beach bum? Then you get to enjoy the beaches throughout the year. Want some excitement? There are always new things to do. The scenery is different depending on where you go; you could drive an hour and have a completely different geography.
  • Teaching standards are high and with small class sizes you will enjoy high levels of personal attention.
  • All 8 Universities are among the world’s top 500 in the 2015/16 QS rankings. On individual subjects, the 2015/16 QS rankings also placed New Zealand universities amongst the world’s top 50 for teaching accounting and finance, business and management, computer science, civil and structural engineering, agriculture and forestry, veterinary science and nine other important disciplines.
  • Employers around the world respect New Zealand’s education system for its ability to balance academic achievements with skills, producing creative, flexible thinkers who are competent at both practical and theoretical levels. NZ is also part of the Lisbon Recognition Convention which means our certificates, diplomas and degrees have international recognition.
  • The education system is regulated with strong quality assurance systems across the board. It creates a consistency that gives you flexibility to pick the institution you want, in the city or town that interests you most, knowing that you will get a quality education.
  • The country has a comparatively low cost of living, abundant fresh food at reasonable prices and a wide variety of student accommodation options.
  • You get a British-based education (due to their British influences) for a percentage of the cost. Students applying for jobs in the UK with a degree from New Zealand are highly sought after by UK employers.
  • Staying in NZ is an amazing opportunity for anyone who looks for adventure. In New Zealand, there are literally thousands of things to do. Do you like to hike? There are plenty of mountains for you to explore. Do you enjoy being a beach bum? Then you get to enjoy the beaches throughout the year. Want some excitement? There are always new things to do. The scenery is different depending on where you go; you could drive an hour and have a completely different geography.
  • Teaching standards are high and with small class sizes you will enjoy high levels of personal attention.
  • All 8 Universities are among the world’s top 500 in the 2015/16 QS rankings. On individual subjects, the 2015/16 QS rankings also placed New Zealand universities amongst the world’s top 50 for teaching accounting and finance, business and management, computer science, civil and structural engineering, agriculture and forestry, veterinary science and nine other important disciplines.
  • Employers around the world respect New Zealand’s education system for its ability to balance academic achievements with skills, producing creative, flexible thinkers who are competent at both practical and theoretical levels. NZ is also part of the Lisbon Recognition Convention which means our certificates, diplomas and degrees have international recognition.
  • The education system is regulated with strong quality assurance systems across the board. It creates a consistency that gives you the flexibility to pick the institution you want, in the city or town that interests you most, knowing that you will get a quality education.
  • The country has a comparatively low cost of living, abundant fresh food at reasonable prices and a wide variety of student accommodation options.
Traditions & Culture: Maori culture is a rich and varied one, and includes traditional and contemporary arts. Traditional arts such as carving, weaving, kapa haka (group performance), whaikorero (oratory) and moko (tattoo) are practiced throughout the country. Practitioners following in the footsteps of their tipuna (ancestors) replicate the techniques used hundreds of years ago, yet also develop exciting new techniques and forms. Today Maori culture also includes art, film, television, poetry, theatre, and hip-hop.
Food: Māori cuisine was historically derived from that of tropical Polynesia, adapted for New Zealand’s colder climate. Key ingredients included kūmara (sweet potato), fern root, taro, birds and fish. Food was cooked in hāngi (earth ovens) and roasted, and in geothermal areas was boiled or steamed using natural hot springs and pools. Various means of preserving birds and other foods were also employed. Māori were one of the few peoples to have no form of alcoholic beverage.
Safety: The 2015 Global Peace Index, which compares 162 countries for the risk of personal violence, rates New Zealand as the world’s fourth safest country just after Iceland, Denmark and Austria.
Welfare: All Education members are signatories to the Code or Practice for the Pastoral Care of International Students. This is a quality assurance document administered by the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). Education institutions take this seriously and are committed to providing the best quality care for students. Long before students step off the plane, the education providers are there helping students with learning assistance, affordable accommodation, and ongoing care and support.
Health: Most international students are not entitled to publicly funded health services while in New Zealand. If you receive medical treatment during your visit, you may be liable for the full costs of that treatment. Full details on entitlements to publicly-funded health services are available through the Ministry of Health, and can be viewed on their website at www.moh.govt.nz
Transport: Most of New Zealand’s cities are relatively small, so it is easy to get around. Day to day commuting in the city is often by bus, biking or walking. There are good bus networks in the main cities (Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin), plus Auckland and Wellington also have commuter rail and ferries.
Rail, bus, ferries
Intercity rail travel in New Zealand is largely limited to services between Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Greymouth. However there are extensive bus services that can take you to just about anywhere you want to go.
Flying
Flying is popular for longer trips, for both personal and business travel.
It’s only an hour to fly between Auckland and Wellington, compared to eight or so hours driving. The Wellington-Christchurch flight is about 50 minutes, compared to a five or six hour driving plus a three hour ferry trip. Of course, if you have time and want to see New Zealand, you may prefer the drive.
  • Approximate Cost of the Course at ITP’s : NZ $ 16,000 – NZ $ 25,000
  • Approximate Cost of the Course at Universities:
    • Undergraduate – $18000 – $25000
    • Post Graduate – $25,000 – $40000
  • Approximate Cost of Living: NZ $ 12,000 – NZ $ 15,000 per annum
Basics:
  • In order to apply for the student VISA the student needs to have good academics
  • Relevant background to the course of choice.
  • Justified intention to study in New Zealand
  • Proof of funds to support the tuition fees and the living expenses
Dependents information: Dependents can accompany if the applicant is traveling for the post- graduate course or a Level 7 course which is under skill shortage area.
Immigration on Arrival: Your passport will be checked when you arrive at the airport to make sure you’re allowed to come into the country. It must be valid for the whole of your stay.
How to Apply: AEC Experts will help you:
Planning & Housing:
It’s a good idea to have some accommodation organized before you arrive in New Zealand. As a student, you could stay in a hall of residence, rent a house with friends, or board in a homestay. Living in a homestay or a hall of residence are probably the best options for someone who is new to New Zealand, because it will allow you to make new friends quickly. Make sure you check how the accommodation you choose is heated, as some older houses in New Zealand are not insulated and can be very cold.
Another accommodation option is a homestay. You can live with a host family, in a room of your own, and they provide meals. Interacting with your hosts and meeting their neighbors and friends is a great way to advance your English and get ‘up close’ with New Zealand’s way of life and culture.
Restricted items to bring to NEW ZEALAND: The importation of a limited number of goods is prohibited outright – for example, objectionable publications and certain dog tracking collars – and approval cannot be given to import them. Others may be allowed in if you have the required approval to import. Approval to import must be obtained before these goods are brought into New Zealand. Use the category filter to find the specific area of prohibited imports that interests you.
http://www.customs.govt.nz/features/prohibited/imports/Pages/default.aspx
Welcome week: Welcome Week is your opportunity to make friends, learn more about studying at the university and living in the country. You will be invited to attend a number of events throughout Welcome Week – some of which are optional and others compulsory.
Travel to your institution: If you are staying near the university, there is shuttle service available. Else, you may chose to travel by trains or buses.
Opening a bank account: Although you open the bank account with ANZ Bank when you apply for the student VISA under FTS but still if you wish to open another account you will need two documents: one to prove your identity and one to prove your address. This applies both in branch and online. Proving your identity is simple. You just need your passport.
Part Time:
Can you work? Yes
What kind of work can you do?
There are various part-time jobs available in all the sectors across hospitality/catering to call centre to banking and finance and etc. With few exceptions, it is very unlikely that you will find a part-time job related to your course of study.
How many hours can you work?
20 hours per week during studies; 40 hours per week during vacations.
Do you need prior approval when you work? No.
About Tax?
Full Time:
Type of Visas
Post Study Work Visa (Open)
The Post Study Work Visa (Open) allows you to find a job that is relevant to your qualification. It’s valid for 12 months, and during this time you can work for almost any employer in New Zealand. After you have found a job relevant to your qualification you can apply for a Post Study Work Visa (Employer Assisted).
Post Study Work Visa (Employer Assisted)
The Post Study Work Visa (Employer Assisted) allows you to stay in New Zealand and work for a specific employer for a further two years, if your job is relevant to your qualification. To be granted a visa, you must hold a Post Study Work Visa – Open or apply no later than 3 months after the end date of your student visa (no later than 6 months if the qualification was a Doctoral Degree).
How to find a job?
Job vacancies here have been growing strongly in the last few years. In fact in the year to March 2015, jobs grew at 3.4 per cent, the highest rate since 2005. Employment is forecast to keep growing at least to 2018, though at a slowing rate.
The other side of the coin, unemployment, was 5.9 per cent in March 2015 – below the OECD average of 6.9 per cent.
1. Understand the Kiwi workplace
Showing an employer that you are familiar with how Kiwi workplaces operate will give them confidence that you will be comfortable in your new role.
2. Understand local qualifications and professional memberships
You’ll have looked into qualifications before you started applying for jobs, but you should check with employers about which qualifications they believe are most useful for their particular role and organisation.
3. Manage your work history
If settling in and job hunting is taking a while, you may have some gaps in your CV. It will help if you can show you’ve been using the time to improve your knowledge and understanding of Kiwi culture, local workplace customs, or Kiwi English.
Volunteering
Doing voluntary work is a very good way to meet people, build up work experience in New Zealand and fill in any awkward gaps in your CV. Volunteering can also lead to references, which can be a real asset in your job search.
Average Salary?
  • Undergraduate: NZ$ 40, 000- NZ$ 60, 000 per annum
  • Postgradaute: NZ$ 60, 000- NZ$ 80, 000 per annum
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